Posts by tag: tea

Slouching At Southwold

Posted by Caz on Saturday, 11th January 2014

On my way back from Wex Photographic today, I stopped off to catch the last rays of the sunshine at the seaside in Southwold:

Lead In To The North Sea

Lead In To The North Sea

There’s a lovely old pier that the golden rays were striking:

Light On The Pier Head

Light On The Pier Head

On the pier I enjoyed a delicious cream tea with a crab:

Cream Tea With A Crab

Cream Tea With A Crab

This was the view of the old lighthouse from our seat:

Lighthouse View

Lighthouse View

Making A Storm In A Teacup

Posted by Caz on Friday, 15th March 2013

Next week I’m giving my High Speed Flash/Water Splashes talk and demo at Brighton & Hove Camera Club. Since I haven’t done any splash pictures for a while, I thought I would get the kit out again and have a play.

Splash In The Cup

Splash In The Cup

I’ve been meaning to use this fab teacup again. It was last seen on Day #1614, so this seemed like the perfect opportunity. The above is an alternative to the shot which made it for Day #1901 – Storm In A Teacup. Here’s the setup:

Teacup setup

Teacup setup

Another Lens Splash

Another Lens Splash

Coincidentally, I was looking for an image for this week’s 50@50 project, and since the cups needed to be photographed a little further away for the full effect, my Canon 50mm f/1.4 USM was perfect for the job. Above right is an alternative for Teabreak Time In The Studio which I chose for 50@50 (2013) #11, seen in the previous post. Mum and Dad gave me the fake lens mug for Christmas and it was crying out for a shot like this!

All About Tea

Posted by Caz on Saturday, 22nd September 2012
Follow That Car! - Crossing the Ooi River

Follow That Car! – Crossing the Ooi River

Today was All About Tea!

I love the stuff, so it seemed only right that I should spend some time seeing how it is produced. Luckily my Japanese friend Tomoo (who is a Professor of Biology and expert in all things tea-related) took me on a great day out to one of Japan’s most productive tea cultivating areas around Shamida and Shizuoka.

I jumped on another Shinkansen and met up with him in Shizuoka where we changed to a local train for Shamida. Then we hired a car for the day to visit some nearby sights.

Driving A Tea Harvester

Driving A Tea Harvester

Our first stop was the NARO Institute of Vegetable and Tea Science where Tomoo used to work a few years ago. Their fascinating open day was very informative, showing how tea is cultivated, dried, tested and blended. Plenty of samples to be had, too – green tea in all the varieties you could possibly want.

It was great that Tomoo was able to catch up with some of his old colleagues, and I got to ride in a tea harvesting machine! I’ve always wanted a go on a Kawasaki – but I wasn’t quite expecting this!

We had to drive a little way to our next stop – lunch in a traditional restaurant of a local tea factory, Grinpia Makinohara. The feast was entirely flavoured with green tea – and utterly delicious! This nearly made it for Day #1727‘s shot:

Green Tea Feast

Green Tea Feast

On the way back to town, we stopped at Tomoo’s favourite shop which sold all manner of tea-related goodies. He’s a well-known customer and stocks up there whenever he is in the area. As he lives a long way away now, that’s not very often – so the owner was delighted to see him. So much so that we were offered tasty green tea ice cream and other freebies!

Partaking Of Tea

Partaking Of Tea

With our bags laden, we headed to Ocha No Sato – the World Tea Museum. Lots of exhibits to take in there, including the reconstruction of a tea house and garden designed by Kobori Enshū, who was a famous 17th Century master of the tea ceremony.

Upholding the centuries-old tradition, we watched as the tea ceremony or otemae was performed for us.

We were also able to grind some of our own green tea powder in a hand-powered granite mill, and take it away as a souvenir.

The final destination of our little tour was to visit Horai-bashi, the longest wooden pedestrian bridge in the world, spanning the river Ooi in 894m. Of course, we walked across and back – just to say we had done it! But the view from the other side was rather impressive, so definitely worth the trip:

How Far To The Other Side?

How Far To The Other Side?

Here are some more pictures which I made during the day: